STEM

Questions? 
Contact Curriculum Supervisor Dr. Ed Ducey at
 
Photos from
Family STEM Night
Tuesday, January 23, 2018
Collierville High School
6:00-8:00pm
 
 
 
Collierville Schools STEM Connection Newsletter

Overview of STEM Programming in Tennessee

STEM Education is designed for students interested in the exciting careers available in the high-demand fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. This program of study is uniquely structured to offer students an overview of STEM fields, occupations, and applications in the first year, followed by more specialized study of the scientific inquiry or engineering design process in subsequent years, culminating in a portfolio and internship experience. Upon completion of this program of study, students will be prepared to pursue advanced study in the STEM field of their choice at a variety of postsecondary institutions.

Given the critical nature of much of the work in STEM, job possibilities abound even in times of economic downturn. More scientists, technologists and engineers will be needed to meet environmental regulations and to develop methods of cleaning up existing hazards. A shift in emphasis toward preventing problems rather than controlling those that already exist, as well as increasing public health concerns, also will spur demand for these positions.

 

Current STEM Course Offerings in Collierville Schools:

 

HIGH SCHOOL COURSES

CHS STEM

 
Information About New High School STEM Curriculum, Innovations in Science and Technology
 
MIDDLE SCHOOL COURSES
 
Starting with the 2018-2019 school year, Collierville Schools will expand our STEM education program at both middle schools. All middle school students in Collierville will receive daily STEM education through a STEM class during the regular school day. Using the Project Lead the Way curriculum (see below), students will begin studying various STEM disciplines through the exploration of real-world challenges. Previous STEM Scholars cohorts will continue to receive the same programming that was promised during their selection, including the capstone experience to the National Flight Academy in Pensacola, FL.
 
Current 5th grade students will have the opportunity to take a placement test in the spring at their elementary school for potential placement in 6th grade Honors Math and/or Honors English courses. Advanced students will have the opportunity to take Honors Algebra I as early as 7th grade and Honors Geometry in 8th grade, as well as Honors English classes. 

New STEM Curriculum: Project Lead the Way

 

Collierville Schools is excited to announce that all middle school STEM classes will be using a new curriculum, Project Lead the Way, starting this August. The middle school curriculum, called PLTW Gateway, will provide our students with versatile skills by studying and exploring real-world challenges. We have selected six of the ten available modules for teachers to take students on rigorous studies into various STEM disciplines throughout the students’ middle school career. Below are short descriptions of the modules from PLTW:

 

6th Grade

Design and Modeling: Students discover the design process and develop an understanding of the influence of creativity and innovation in their lives. Students use tools such as the design process, a dynamic mathematics software, a computer-aided design program, computer simulations, and engineering notebook, and possibly a 3D printer to design, model, and build objects. They are challenged and empowered to use and apply what they’ve learned throughout the unit to design a therapeutic toy for a child who has cerebral palsy, fabricate and test it, and make necessary modifications to optimize the design solution.

 

Energy and the Environment: Students are challenged to think big toward the future as they explore sustainable solutions to our energy needs and investigate the impact of energy on our lives and the world. They use what they’ve learned to design and model alternative energy sources, as well as evaluate options for reducing energy consumption. Students use tools such as the engineering design process, an engineering notebook, and alternative energy modeling to invent and innovate.

 

7th Grade

Automation and Robotics: Students trace the history, development, and impact of automation and robotics as they explore mechanical systems, energy transfer, machine automation, and computer control systems. Using the VEX Robotics platform, students apply what they know to design and program traffic lights, toll booths, robotic arms, and more.

 

Medical Detectives: Students play the role of real-life medical detectives as they analyze genetic testing results to diagnose disease and study DNA evidence found at a “crime scene.” They use tools such as the engineering design process, an engineering notebook, and electrophoresis to solve medical mysteries through hands-on projects and labs, investigate how to measure and interpret vital signs, and learn how the systems of the human body work together to maintain health. 

 

8th Grade

Science of Technology: Science impacts the technology or yesterday, today, and the future. In this unit, students apply the concepts of physics, chemistry, and nanotechnology to STEM activities and projects. They will use tools such as the engineering design process, an engineering notebook, computer simulations, and prototyping materials to invent and innovate, including making ice cream, creating adhesives, cleaning up an oil spill, using machines to create motion, and discovering the properties and applications of nanomaterials.

 

Flight and Space: The exciting world of aerospace comes alive through Flight and Space. During this unit, students delve into the history of flight and space, discover the science behind aeronautics, and explore traveling and living in space. Students are then challenged to use the engineering design process, an engineering notebook, computer simulations, and their knowledge to design, build, and test an airfoil.

 

 

 

 

Summer Work 

As a reminder, Honors Math and Honors ELA students are required to complete summer work for Math and English/Language Arts. Click here to access the summer work for math. Click here to access the summer work for ELA.

 

 

 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL COURSES
 

Collierville Schools is excited to offer the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) curriculum in Kindergarten through 8th grade starting in August 2017. Looking to build students’ foundational knowledge of the natural integration and application of science, technology engineering, and math, Collierville Schools will now offer STEM class, using the PLTW Launch curriculum, as part of the regular rotation of courses at each of our elementary schools. STEM had previously only been a club with limited size at the elementary school level. With this expansion of STEM, all elementary students in the district will now have the opportunity to participate in STEM education. STEM clubs of limited size will remain as an extension of the PLTW curriculum. Topics elementary students will experience that will supplement and/or enhance the regular science and math curriculum include:

 

Kindergarten

Picture-Perfect STEM Lessons - From NSTA Press, these lessons draw from fiction and nonfiction books that provide a foundation of science exploration. Students learn how to ask questions, define problems, and design their own processes for developing solutions, and engage in argument from evidence.

Animals and Algorithms – Students explore the nature of computers and the ways humans control and use technology. Starting with an unplugged activity, students learn about the sequential nature of computer programs. Students are inspired by a story in which Angelina, Mylo, and Suzi make videos to teach preschoolers about animals in their habitats. Then, students work in small groups to design and program a simple digital animation about an animal in its habitat.

 

1st Grade
Animal Adaptations
– Students explore animal adaptations for protection, camouflage, food obtainment, and locomotion. Students learn what it means for an organism to be adapted to its environment and how different adaptations can be categorized. Students are introduced to the design challenge when Suzi announces she is visiting the Sahara and needs to get prepared for her trip. Students are challenged to design the ideal shoe for travelers to wear in extreme environments, applying what they have learned and looking to plant and animal adaptations to guide their designs.
Animated Storytelling – Students explore the sequential nature of computer programs through hands-on activities, both with and without a computer. They examine key aspects of storytelling and devise how to transition a narrative from page to screen. Students discover the design problem through a story about Angelina, Mylo, and Suzi, who wish they could find a way to create a story with characters who move and interact with each other. Combining fundamental principles of computer science with story-building skills, students develop animations that showcase characters, settings, actions, and events from short stories of their own creation.

2nd Grade
Pushes and Pulls – Students investigate pushes and pulls on the motion of an object and develop knowledge and skills related to forces of differing strengths and directions. Their explorations include pushes and pulls found in their everyday world, such as pushing a friend on a swing or pulling a wagon. In this module’s design problem, Suzi needs to move rocks from her yard so she can install a swing set. Students work through the problem by applying what they learn about forces. Materials Science: Properties of Matter
– Students investigate and classify different kinds of materials by their observable properties, including color and texture. They learn about states of matter and properties of materials including insulators and conductors. In the design problem, Angelina, Mylo, and Suzi, are challenged to keep ice pops cold during a soccer game – without a cooler. Students apply their knowledge and skills to determine the best material to solve this design problem and then evaluate how their designs might be improved.

Grids and Games – Students investigate numerical relationships while learning about the sequence and structure required in computer programs. Starting with computer-free activities and moving to tablet-based challenges, students apply addition and subtraction strategies to make characters move on a grid. Angelina presents the design problem when she expresses her desire to design a game she can play on her tablet. Using skills and knowledge gained from these activities, students work together in groups to design and develop a game in which a player interacts with objects on a tablet screen.

 

3rd Grade
Infection: Detection – Students explore transmission of infection, agents of disease, and mechanisms the body uses to stay healthy. Through a simulation, they compare communicable and non-communicable diseases. In the design problem, Suzi comes down with a fever and sore throat, and her friends wonder how this illness might have spread across the school. Students tackle the design problem by examining evidence to deduce the agent of infection, the likely source of the outbreak, and the path of transmission through a school. They design and run an experiment related to limiting the spread of germs and apply results to propose appropriate prevention methods.

Programming Patterns – This module introduces students to the power of modularity and abstraction. Starting with computer-free activities and progressing to programming in a blocks-based language on a tablet, students learn how to think computationally about a problem. Angelina, Mylo, and Suzi set the stage for the design problem as they discuss their desire to create video games on their tablet. Students then create a tablet game using modular functions and branching logic.

 

4th Grade
Input/Output: Computer Systems – In this exploration of how computers work, students are encouraged to make analogies between the parts of the human body and parts that make up a computer. Students investigate reaction time as a measure of nervous system function. After Mylo suffers a concussion, his friends become interested in how to diagnose concussions and create a reaction-time computer program to assess a baseline before a concussion occurs. Students apply what they have learned to build their own reaction- time measurement devices on tablets.

Energy: Collisions – Students explore the properties of mechanisms and how they change energy by transferring direction, speed, type of movement, and force. Students discover a variety of ways potential energy can be stored and released as kinetic energy. They explain the relationship between the speed of an object and the energy of that object, as well as predict the transfer of energy as a result of a collision between two objects. The design problem is introduced by Angelina, Mylo, and Suzi watching amusement park bumper cars collide. As students solve the problem for this module, they apply their knowledge and skills to develop a vehicle restraint system.

 

5th Grade
Robotics and Automation
– Students explore the ways robots are used in today’s world and their impact on society and the environment. Students learn about a variety of robotic components as they build and test mobile robots that may be controlled remotely. Angelina, Mylo, and Suzi are tasked with designing a mobile robot that can remove hazardous materials from a disaster site. Students are then challenged to design, model, and test a mobile robot that solves this design problem.

Variation of Traits – Students investigate the differences between inherited genetic traits and traits learned or influenced by the environment. They explore the phenomena that o spring may express different traits than parents as they learn about dominant and recessive genes and also investigate how predicted outcomes compare to experimental results. Angelina, Mylo, and Suzi introduce the design problem when challenged to examine different traits found in three sets of seeds. Students then model how the gene for stem color is passed on and expressed among sample sets.

 

 
 
 
While certainly not an exhaustive list, the following links may prove helpful in learning and practicing STEM skills, learning about STEM careers, and STEM camp opportunities:
Collierville Schools is not responsible for questionable or controversial content found through links external to this site. Collierville Schools offers educational and employment opportunities without regard to race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, or disability, and adheres to the provisions of the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).
 
 
STEM Fun for Kids Grades K-12
 
Cool STEM Websites
  • Arrick Robotics: This the prettiest website in the world, but if you’re looking for robotics resources, this is the place to be. Includes lists of competitions and contests, groups and clubs, games and simulation.
  • Ask Dr. Universe: Washington State University’s Ask Dr. Universe allows kids to explore various STEM topics and get answers to common questions. Have a question not covered on the site? Submit it on their “Ask” page!
  • The Big Brain Theory – Discovery Channel: Competitors on this TV show have just 30 minutes to come up with a solution to an (seemingly) impossible engineering challenge.
  • Bill Nye the Science Guy: Bill’s entertaining television episodes cover everything from comets to the science of music. Have some fun with his home demos.
  • CanTEEN: CanTEEN was developed to help girls explore STEM careers. Take a challenge (such as creating your own urban garden), play games like “Click! Spy School” or learn more about real-life role models.
  • Chi Alpha Mu: Otherwise known as the National Junior Mathematics Club, Chi Alpha Mu is the younger sibling of Mu Alpha Theta. Check out its list of contests and summer grants.
  • Code.org: No one is too young (or old, I might add) to code. Learn how to build an iPhone game, write your first computer program, draw in JavaScript and much more.
  • Codeacademy: Learn to code interactively (and for free). Codeacademy offers coding classes in major programming languages like Python, PHP, jQuery, JavaScript and Ruby.
  • DiscoverE: Thinking about engineering? DiscoverE has a selection of resources on careers, preparing for college and research schools. You might also want to check out their list of videos, trips, websites and hands-on activities.
  • Engineer Girl!: Why should you become an engineer? Let this website for middle school girls explain. Along with interviews, quizzes, fun facts and profiles, it has links to scores of engineering contests, clubs, programs and scholarships.
  • Engineer Your Life: Dream big and love what you do. This guide to engineering for high school girls is packed with profiles of inspiring women, great tips for college prep and helpful job tools.
  • Engineering, Go for It! (eGFI): Discover the nuts and bolts of engineering. This website contains advice on careers, entertaining info on all kinds of fields and links to the eGFI magazine.
  • Environmental Health Student Portal: Interested in learning more about chemicals, air quality and water pollution? This website has videos, games and experiments to help you along.
  • EPA Students: Searching for news on the environment, homework resources, info on contests or ideas for an environment-based school project? Check out this website run by the Environmental Protection Agency.
  • Exploratorium: One of my favorites. The website of the San Francisco-based Exploratorium is jam-packed with interactive activities, videos, apps, links and more.
  • Extreme Science: Extremely interesting. Here you’ll find wild and weird facts about nature, resources for science projects and info on all kinds of world records.
  • For Girls in Science: Be what you want to be. Sponsored by L’Oréal, this site offers all kinds of STEM options, including a video blog, profiles of women in science, a list of summer camps and info about careers.
  • Funology: At Funology, science is bound to get interactive. Make a tornado with water. Build a Jurassic Park terrarium. Or, simply torment your siblings with endless jokes about bugs and insects.
  • Girls Communicating Career Connections (GC3): Curious about a career in science or technology? This youth-produced media series for girls from undeserved groups has lots and lots of ideas to explore.
  • Girl Scouts STEM Program: Push your limits as you make the world a better place. To support STEM experiences, the Girl Scouts have developed three leadership journeys and a number of STEM proficiency badges.
  • G2O: Generating Girls Opportunities: G2O is an initiative of The Connecticut Women’s Education and Legal Fund (CWEALF) designed to engage girls, parents, and teachers in expanding girls’ educational opportunities. Visit their website to explore careers in STEM, participate in summer contests, and more!
  • Helping Your Child Learn Mathematics: Your parents might be interested in this. Curated by the U.S. Department of Education, this website contains math activities (to be completed at home, at the store and on the go) for preschoolers and elementary kids.
  • How Stuff Works: I visit this website every day. It has hundreds upon thousands of articles that explain the wonders of science (and almost everything else on the planet).
  • iWASwondering.org: Inspired by “Women’s Adventures in Science” and developed by the National Academy of Sciences, this website invites you to investigate the careers of famous women scientists.
  • Kids.gov: From imaginary jungles to ion experiments, Kids.gov has plenty of resources for a rainy day. Watch an animation on thunder and lightning or take a virtual field trip to the National Zoo.
  • Kids Ahead: A STEM bonanza. Kids Ahead is packed with all kinds of resources, including scavenger hunts, videos, articles, links to local activities and fun events and info on cool jobs, that inspire and excite.
  • Kids Do Ecology: Every kid should be an ecological hero. Learn about biomes, blue whales and data collecting. You can even create your own classroom experiment. Available en Español.
  • The Kids’ Science Challenge (KSC): Hands-on science activities, games, cool videos, scavenger hunts … this website is full of fun stuff. KSC also hosts a free, nationwide science competition for students in grades three to six.
  • MathMovesU: Hone your math skills with online games, virtual thrill rides and national competitions! MathMovesU also offers a variety of scholarships and sponsorships.
  • Mu Alpha Theta: Also known as the National High School and Two-Year College Mathematics Honor Society, Mu Alpha Theta has over 100,000 student members. It organizes a national math convention, offers special awards and provides competitions.
  • Museum of Science + Industry Chicago Online Science: Apps and activities and videos, oh my! Play games, watch baby chicks hatching, create virtual chemical reactions or use forensic science to analyze different types of candy.
  • MythBusters – Discovery Channel: The folks at MythBusters use experiments to bust rumors, myths and urban legends. (During their Cannonball Chemistry experiment, they accidentally drove a cannonball through the side of a house.)
  • NASA Education for Students: Career information, image galleries, NASA Television, features and articles … whatever you’d like to know about aerospace, you’re sure to find it here.
  • NASA Kids’ Club: At NASA Kids’ Club, it’s perfectly okay to fool around in space. You can use your science and math skills to explore Mars, construct a fleet of rockets or search for NASA spinoffs in your garage.
  • NASA Science, Engineering, Mathematics and Aerospace Academy (SEMAA): SEMAA was developed to increase the participation of historically underserved K-12 youth in STEM fields. School activities and summer sessions are held throughout the nation.
  • NASA Space Place: Build your own spacecraft, play space volcanoes or browse through a gallery of sun images. When you’re at the Space Place, the universe is the limit.
  • National Geographic Kids: Which do you think is cuter: the puffer fish or the clown fish? On this website, you can vote in polls, take part in eggs-periments, watch videos, play puzzles and learn amazing facts.
  • NOVA: The website for PBS’s popular science show is overflowing with videos and articles. Explore the wonders of evolution, nature, physics, math—practically any STEM subject that rings your bell.
  • PBS SciGirls: SciGirls videos are great resources for the classroom. Each episode follows a different group of middle school girls who are designing and building STEM projects.
  • Sally Ride Science: Founded by America’s first female astronaut, Sally Ride Science hosts a number of student programs, including science festivals and overnight camps.
  • Science Bob: Bob is a science teacher who loves to experiment (often on Jimmy Kimmel). His website has videos, links and plenty of ideas for build-your-own experiments and science fair projects.
  • Science Buddies: Get stuck on science. This website has over 1,000 ideas for science fair projects, project guides, project kits and detailed profiles of STEM careers.
  • Science Channel: Question everything. Along with a rundown on the Science Channel’s TV programs, this website has plenty of videos, quizzes, games and the latest science news.
  • SciJinks: It’s all about the weather. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) and NASA put together this educational website to teach kids about meteorology and earth science. Check out their games section.
  • Scratch: Designed for kids age 8 to 16, Scratch is a place where you can program your own interactive stories, games and animations. A project of the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab.
  • STEM-Works: In addition to articles and job information, STEM-Works has stocked their site with interesting activities. Test your skills in the reptile quiz. Rescue an athlete in the Bionic Games. Or, simply follow the path of great whites with the Global Shark Tracker.
  • Society of Women Engineers (SWE) K-12 Outreach: Aspire to be great. You’ll find a huge variety of engineering resources on this site, including links to activities, competitions, camps and scholarships.
  • Student Science: A central spot for science news, blogs, resources and information about Intel competitions. Sample article titles include “Native ‘snot'” and “A library with no books.”
  • TechRocket: A year-round online learning destination for kids and teens. Use the promo code “MIDSFREE” to get a free first month!
  • Tynker: A computing platform that allows children to develop programming skills through fun, creative courses. Join the millions of kids from around the country learning to code with Tynker!
  • Weather Wiz Kids: Meet meteorologist Crystal Wicker. She’s put together a website that explains everything about the weather. Find fun facts, games, flashcards and photos, plus get answers to your meteorological questions.
  • Women@NASA: Meet the women you want to be. This NASA site includes video interviews and biographies of NASA employees, as well as info on careers, events and outreach programs. Energy.gov has a sister site called Women@Energy.
STEM Career Resources
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics K-12: The U.S. Department of Labor has been busy. Here you’ll find charts, maps and many other resources on careers and the U.S. economy.
  • Career Aisle: Elementary: Dreaming about what you want to be when you grow up? These videos about jobs in science, technology, engineering and math can help you decide.
  • Career Aisle: High School: You’ll find a truckload of exploratory videos on Career Aisle’s website, as well as links to wage information and career prep resources.
  • Career Aisle: Middle School: Wondering what the future might hold? Explore some of the options available to you in science, technology, engineering and math. Lots of videos.
  • Career Cornerstone Center: It won’t win any prizes for beauty, but Career Cornerstone Center has a lot of helpful resources on STEM careers. Explore over 185 degree fields, dip into interviews or learn more about education requirements, typical salaries and networking.
  • CareerOneStop: Learn all you need to know about STEM careers, including typical occupations, internships and education options. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.
  • Get Biotech Smart: Curious about biotechnology research? Have a look at these video podcasts, e-learning courses and resources.
  • IEEE Try Computing: A good resource if you’re just starting to look into computing. You can explore career options and majors, search for accredited programs and tinker with the visual career cloud tool.
  • IEEE Try Engineering: This website includes a university search, info on engineering majors and a long list of links to camps, internships, scholarships, contests and more. You’ll also find insights from experts and virtual engineering games.
  • IEEE Try Nano: IEEE gets around. In the third of their career sites (see above), they look at jobs in nanoscience and nanotechnology: technical fields that focus on matter at the nanoscale.
  • iON Future: If web surfing isn’t your style, you can always play the free STEM career exploration game. It’s geared toward middle school and early high school students.
  • Kids.gov Jobs: Get the skinny on every job under the sun. Wondering what marine biologists do? Want to watch a video on becoming a veterinarian? You’re in the right place.
  • NASA Look to the Future: Careers in Space: You don’t have to be an astronaut to work in the space program. NASA has a list of other professions, including robotics engineer, computer scientist and oceanographer, for you to consider.
  • Take IT & Go Anywhere: Your source for all things IT. Check out their list of degree programs, upcoming IT events, internships, student programs, advice on paying for college, career fairs, websites and the like.
  • WeUseMath.org: Ever wondered (as I frequently did) when you’re going to use math in real life? This website on math careers has more than a few answers.
STEM Camps
 
  • Alaska Summer Research Academy (ASRA) – High School: At ASRA, you’ll spend two weeks on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus, working in small teams and participating in project-based learning. Some modules will take you to remote areas of Alaska for fieldwork.
  • Alexa Cafe: Students collaborate in small, close-knit clusters. With an emphasis on entrepreneurship, leadership, brand identity, and philanthropy, you’ll build tech skills in a unique, stylish setting, alongside tech-savvy female mentors. Weeklong day and overnight sessions in programming, game design, filmmaking, and more.
  • Ambition Program: Boldly go where no kid has gone before. Immerse yourself in a six-day aviation-themed learning adventure at the National Flight Academy in Florida.
  • Audubon Nature Camps: Audobon offers a ton of Nature Camps throughout the country. Beginning in April, they start taking applications for Wild Birds Pathways to Nature.
  • Camp Euclid: A Mathematics Research Camp: Participate from virtually anywhere! Camp Euclid’s six-week summer camps are held online. Collaborate with fellow students on solution-defying math problems.
  • Camp Invention: Daydreams become discoveries at this summer day camp. Created by the National Inventors Hall of Fame, Camp Invention presents essential STEM concepts through creative hands-on activities.
  • Camp KAOS: To infinity and beyond! These cool flight and space adventure-themed camps take place at the Smithsonian-affiliated Kansas Cosmophere and Space Center (KAOS) in Hutchinson, Kansas.
  • Camp Reach: From constructing the perfect shoe to building the ultimate ice cream sundae, this two-week summer camp at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts is designed to stretch your engineering imagination. For girls entering seventh grade.
  • Design-Connect-Create! Physics Camps for Young Women: Live in or near North Texas? Get a hands-on introduction to key principles in AP Physics. For high school girls entering their junior year.
  • Destination Science Camp: Spend a week this summer creating robots, building a digital music system, training an electric-powered chameleon or even preparing for a mission to the moon! Held at 130 locations in six states.
  • DigiGirlz High Tech Camp: Microsoft’s career-based camps are held throughout the U.S. and abroad. You’ll have the chance to listen to tech speakers, take tours, network and get some hands-on experience in workshops. Variable schedule. For high school girls.
  • Digital Media Academy Adventures Camp: Digital Media’s award-winning camps cover everything from cartoon creation to computer programming to advanced robotics with LEGO® EV3. For kids age 8 to 12.
  • Digital Media Summer Camp for Teens: Digital Media’s award-winning summer camps are for teens age 12 to 17. Learn about game design and development, programming and apps, filmmaking and visual effects or 3-D modeling and animation.
  • E2@UMD: Explore engineering at the University of Maryland. Over the course of one week in the summer, you’ll take part in hands-on activities, lab experiments, team challenges and seminars with professional engineers. For rising juniors and seniors.
  • Earth Camp: Explore the wonders of Arizona’s Sonora Desert. You’ll camp in the wilderness, scan the night sky at the University of Arizona Sky Center and become an expert in sustainability and water resource issues.
  • Engineering for Kids: Engineering for Kids is an education company for kids age 4 to 14. It offers a variety of STEM programs, including in-school field trips, birthday parties, workshops and camps.
  • Engineering Summer Camps: Interested in building the world’s future? The Engineering Education Service Center has put together a state-by-state list of engineering summer camps.
  • The ExxonMobil Bernard Harris Summer Science Camp (EMBHSSC): Live (and play) on a real college campus. Designed to support underrepresented middle school kids, these popular summer science camps are located across the country.
  • Game Camp Nation: Game Camp Nation offers fun programs that harness your child’s passion for video games. They have East Coast locations from Massachusetts to Atlanta for kids from 7 to 16 years old. A few programs they currently offer include Game Design with Tynker, Coding & Minecraft Modding with Java, and 3D Game Programming with Unity.
  • Girls’ Adventures in Mathematics, Engineering, and Science (G.A.M.E.S.): Be part of a state-of-the-art engineering or science lab this summer! At the University of Illinois’s G.A.M.E.S., you’ll work on challenging camp projects and meet mentors in technical fields. For rising nine through 12th graders.
  • Girls Reaching to Achieve in Sports & Physics (GRASP): Hosted by Ohio State University’s Department of Physics, GRASP is a five-day summer camp loaded with physics fun. OSU staff and students are present at all sessions to share their love of the subject. For middle school girls.
  • Girlstart: Get stuck on STEM subjects. Girlstart’s Austin-based programs (including summer camps, Saturday STEM workshops and Science Extravaganzas) are open to girls in kindergarten through age 16.
  • iD Game Design & Development Academy: These two-week summer camps offer an intensive submersion in game development, programming, design, 3-D modeling and animation. Choose from courses in Minecraft, Unreal® Engine, Maya®, iPhone® and more. For teens age 13 to 18.
  • iD Programming Academy: Ideal for students with previous programming experience who want to take their coding skills to the next level. Camps are held at university campuses across the U.S. For teens age 13 to 18.
  • iD Tech Camps: The sky’s the limit at iD Tech’s day and overnight camps. Make your own video game, program your own app or even code in Java.
  • KinderCare® Summer Camps: From the wacky wet science of water to the basics of surviving in the wilderness, KinderCare offers a variety of programs for pre-K through school-age kids.
  • Northern Illinois University STEM Camps: Northern Illinois University holds STEM summer camps that allow middle school kids to engage in interdisciplinary activities. Students learn through classes, hands-on activities, and more!
  • Northern Illinois University STEM Camps: NIU offers multiple STEM summer camps for high school students, including STEM Career Explorations, Crisis on Mars!, and Eagle’s Nest STEAM Camp.
  • Physics Wonder Girls at Indiana Wesleyan University: Funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation, the Physics Wonder Girls camp offers middle school girls the opportunity to take part in hands-on physics experiments, projects, physics-based games, and science tours.
  • Science and Engineering Apprenticeship Program (SEAP): Interested in science or math? Then you could intern for eight weeks at a Department of Navy (DoN) laboratory. Most labs require students to be 16 years of age (though 15-year-olds will sometimes be allowed).
  • Science Explorers: Sharks and submarines, potions and slime, castles and catapults .. whatever you love, these science summer camps have just the activity for you. Offered in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware.
  • The Smith Summer Science and Engineering Program (SSEP): One hundred girls, four weeks, one incredible experience. At this Massachusetts summer camp, you’ll be immersed in two fascinating research courses. For rising rising nine through 12th graders.
  • STEM Summer Institute at MIT: During the summer, STEM offers a five-week math and science institute at MIT for students entering grades six through nine. Field trips and racquet sports included.
  • Students with Potential and Interest, Considering Engineering (S.P.I.C.E.): Build a new world. Through activities, projects, tours and talks at the University of Maryland, College Park, you’ll learn how engineering is being used to change the face of the planet. For girls entering ninth and 10th grades.
  • Summer Academy for Mathematics and Science (SAMS): Carnegie Mellon’s competitive summer program is for promising students entering their junior or senior year of high school and contemplating a STEM career. The course load is fairly heavy, but there’s no tuition, housing or dining fees if you’re selected.
  • Vision Tech Camps: Vision Tech offers camps for kids ages 7-17 in the San Francisco Bay Area. Camp topics include robotics, programming, minecraft, and more.
  • Women in Natural Science (WINS): Hosted by Drexel University’s Academy of Natural Sciences, this after-school and summer science enrichment program is free! For promising eighth graders who plan to attend a public or charter school in Philadelphia.
  • Youth Digital Summer Camps: Design 3-D models for Minecraft, create your own video game or even direct a 3-D animation! These camps focused on digital technology are held in various southern cities. For kids age 8 to 16.
  • Youth Empowered Action (YEA): YEA is a week-long overnight camp for youth age 12 to 17 who want to change the world. Workshops include “Planetary Problem Puzzles” and “A Million Ways to Make a Difference.”
  • Zero Robotics Middle School Summer Program: Launch yourself into computer programming, robotics and space engineering. MIT’s five-week STEM curriculum will immerse you in space and provide you with hands-on experience programming SPHERES (Synchronized, Position, Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites).
Upcoming STEM Events:
 
 
 
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